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Unboxing Econet’s $99 Home Power Station

   

Yesterday, we shared some information on the discount that Econet is offering on its Home Power Station (HPS). This is a solar powered unit that offers lighting and device charging capabilities for users that are off the main power grid.

We managed to get some more details on the HPS, information that ought to clear up some of the questions that have been raised about the unit.

Current Model has no SIM Card

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As mentioned in the previous article, the current HPS being sold at $99 (it’s the same model that was retailing at $163  before the discounts) is a different version from the older units that were first introduced when Econet launched its solar devices unit. It also does not have a SIM card slot.

No SIM Card means no prepaid system

One other difference that comes with this new unit, because of the absence of SIM functionality, is that there is no prepaid system. According to the sales team at Econet, this means that the $99 is a cash only basis, with no staggered payments enabled through the prepaid model.

It’s cash only, no credit terms

Econet is not offering any other credit terms for the HPS right now, although some plans are being explored to do so for civil servants in the short term. This is hardly surprising considering the recent changes in the Zimbabwean Labour Law.

No additional charges after you buy the HPS

Once you pick up the HPS, you don’t have to assume any additional costs or monthly charges. You will, however, face the normal charges that come with any solar powered source for maintenance and there are options for lighting that Econet is also retailing in its stores, like the solar powered candle.


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