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Police Warn People After Man Loses Over $19 000 To Scammers

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Another day another scam.Banks have lately been issuing warning about the rise of scams but it seems like it’s not enough to safeguard clients from scammers. Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) recently dealt with a case where a man was swindled ZWL $19658.05 out of his bank account by scammers over a phone call.

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Through it’s, Twitter handle, ZRP revealed that the unfortunate victim received a call via a landline from a scammer pretending to be a bank employee. The scammer was said to have been “armed with all information concerning the man (victim)” so the victim easily gave away his PIN to the scammer. And in no time over $19 000 had vanished from his accounts.

ZRP didn’t disclose whether they caught the scammer or not but with information such as the number used in making the call and the account that received the stolen funds, they likely know the criminal or,at best, they have already arrested the scammer. My parting words are the same as those ZRP already said: Don’t reveal your pin or password to anyone over a call or SMS!

Also read: Watch: Zimbabwean Arrested In China For Stealing $1 300 Using Fake Bank Cards


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7 thoughts on “Police Warn People After Man Loses Over $19 000 To Scammers

  1. “Banking details” is a vague reference. How do you do business, without revealing your banking details?

    It’s “don’t reveal your password or pin to anyone!” It’s doesn’t matter whether it’s to a bank official at a bank branch. You don’t…

  2. In most cases the number used to phone and the account that is credited with fraudulently acquired funds are opened using fake personal details. It’s a dead end for investigators.

    1. The destination bank should be held accountable for lack of due diligence, with regards to KYC procedures. It just that people in Zimbabwe are used to “kunyura”, so they drop issues as a loss quickly. Failure to vett clientele properly can make a bank complicit to some of these crimes.

      1. KYC does not work in Zim, my friend.
        Once the “paper work” is in place, an account in opened. No further verification is done. So long as you can fill in an affidavit yourself (tenant), forge signatures and have it signed and stamped by a a commissioner of oaths, boom, you have an account.

        Who bothers to verify the ID card presented by a 50 year old man, who was 20 at the time of registration?

        Today, one can use fake KYC info available on Ecocash to open a bank account on his mobile phone!

  3. In most cases the number used to phone and the account that is credited with fraudulently acquired funds are opened using fake personal details. It’s a dead end for investigators.

  4. KYC does not work in Zim, my friend.
    Once the “paper work” is in place, an account in opened. No further verification is done. So long as you can fill in an affidavit yourself (tenant), forge signatures and have it signed and stamped by a a commissioner of oaths, boom, you have an account.

    Who bothers to verify the ID card presented by a 50 year old man, who was 20 at the time of registration?

    Today, one can use fake KYC info available on Ecocash to open a bank account on his mobile phone!

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