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Infographic: Preserving Your Digital Memories – How Smartphones Have Changed Photography

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The widespread availability of smartphones has completely changed attitudes towards photography and we are taking far more photos than ever before. Studies have shown that in the year 2000, 86 billion photos were taken.

As smartphones rose in popularity in the 2000s, this number rose and rose, hitting 380 billion a decade later and rising to a mind boggling 1.2 trillion photos by 2017. That’s 160 photos for every single person on the planet, and we take more photos in two minutes than throughout the entire 19th century.

So just what is happening to all these photos? In the past, photography was a luxury and photos were something to be printed, framed, and treasured. Today, our photos are more likely to end up left on phones and computers and forgotten; just 7% of people regularly print off photos. But with technological malfunctions and data losses always lurking around the corner, are our memories really safe? One in three people have lost important photos and videos after losing a smartphone – whether that’s irreplaceable shots from a wedding, or treasured photos of children growing up.

How can you preserve all these digital memories and make sure you’ve got photos to cherish for years to come? Mark Lord Photography have brought together all the data and put together the following infographic to explore these changing attitudes towards photography – as well as some helpful tips on how to stop your important photos from becoming digital dust.


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One thought on “Infographic: Preserving Your Digital Memories – How Smartphones Have Changed Photography

  1. Photography has changed a lot since it has been developed last time. Smartphones contributed to it. Your phone isn’t only the camera anymore but also the storage and the editor. The issue is to enjoy the tech possibilities and don’t lose in quality.

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